Today Is National Nurses Day – Thank a Nurse! $8 Off All Oil Changes

Nurses Day Oil Change

Nurses Day Oil Change

At the end of the 19th century, “The Lady With the Lamp”— or as she is more widely known, Florence Nightingale — founded modern nursing. Thanks to her strict use of hand-washing and hygiene practices while caring for wounded soldiers in the Crimean War, Nightingale and her helpers reduced the death rate from 42% to 2% — ushering in nursing as we know it today. On May 6, we recognize the important role nurses play in our lives by celebrating National Nurses Day.

HISTORY OF NATIONAL NURSES DAY

National Nurses Day is the first day of National Nursing Week, which concludes on May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Yet the week was first observed in the US in October 1954 to mark the 100th anniversary of Nightingale’s pioneering work in Crimea.

In 1953, Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower asking him to proclaim a “Nurse Day” in October of the following year to coincide with the anniversary. Although the President didn’t act, the celebration was observed thanks to a bill sponsored by Representative Frances P. Bolton, and the following year a new bill was introduced to Congress lobbying for official recognition of the celebration.

Twenty years later, in February of 1974, President Nixon proclaimed a National Nurse Week to be celebrated annually in May. Over the next eight years, various nursing organizations including the American Nurses Association (ANA) rallied to support calls for a “National Recognition Day for Nurses” on May 6, which was eventually proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1982.

With over 3 million working nurses in the US today, nurses make up the highest percentage of the US healthcare workforce. Although you might not imagine it, nurses are more likely to sustain a back injury on a shift than construction workers, and they walk an average of 5 kilometers per shift, as caring for others’ health is such an active job!

If you think nurses are only found in hospitals, then think again! The majority of registered nurses (59%) practice elsewhere, such as a nursing home or on home visits. They work across communities to keep people worldwide happy and healthy, and National Nurses Day is the perfect opportunity to show your appreciation for their important work!

SCL Continues to Respond to On-Site Fueling Needs for Refrigerated Trucks

Decreased Restaurant Demand Leads to Reliance on Reefers as Outside Storage

Amid national efforts to stop the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19), restaurants nationwide have closed their doors to customers following state mandates urging residents to stay at home.

Those restrictions have resulted in quite a conundrum for grocery distribution centers, which have ramped up orders to account for a rush on grocery stores. As supply chains struggle to keep up with demand, however, those same distribution centers have begun using refrigerated trucks for storage outside their facilities.

“Although this is certainly a unique time, using refrigerated trucks for storage is not a unique situation,” said SCL Fuels Specialist Keith Kerslake. “Many grocery distributors around the holidays will order extra food to account for spikes in demand, and florists will occasionally use them around Valentine’s Day to store extra product outside their facilities. Where we come in is we have the expertise and the capability to fuel those trucks and keep them running while they’re being used for storage.”

Reefers – as they are commonly called – can typically run for 4-5 days on a 50-gallon tank, if being driven under normal circumstances. When used as outside storage, a full tank can power a reefer for even longer, depending on its capacity and upkeep.

According to Kerslake, it’s recommended that reefers be filled before fuel levels go below ¼ tank.

SCL has offered on-site fueling for customers requiring either bobtail or wet-hosing services in San Diego, Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside counties, Lancaster and the high desert, and the Bay Area for several years. For more information on on-site reefer fueling, contact Kerslake at kerslakek@scoil.com.

 

Contact an SCL Consultant today 

In a wide range of automotive, industrial and commercial sectors, SCL remains steadfast on its commitment to product and industry knowledge, performance satisfaction and superior logistics. We protect and optimize the machines that keep our country moving. For more information on how we help can help with services including bulk purchasing or managing inventory, contact an SCL expert today.

 

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In Response to State-Wide Coronavirus Shutdowns, SCL Customers Experience Mixed Results

After Gov. Gavin Newsom called for a statewide shutdown of non-essential business in California in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, many SCL customers in industrial manufacturing found themselves unaffected due to longstanding military, aerospace and medical industry contracts. Others, however, have battled to remain “essential” and able to operate, including breweries that have pivoted to producing hand sanitizer instead of brews.

By the nature of their business, many SCL customers are deemed critical – such facilities that produce components used by the military and supplies for hospitals – but a few, including some producers of niche goods, have been forced to close.

 

WHAT’S GOOD IN INDUSTRIAL MACHINING

The most positive news out of the industrial manufacturing sector is that most facilities have remained open and operating, even if that has meant finding new ways to do business – from staggering shifts and instituting remote work to creating new products.

“A good portion of our business is metal working business, and everyone there is operating because they’re either dealing with aerospace, military, government or the medical field,” said SCL Industrial Lubricants Consultant Mike Schulze. “We do work with some breweries where the tasting rooms and the restaurant facilities have closed, but they’ve been able to continue operations because they’ve converted their process to manufacture isopropyl alcohol.”

The shortage of hand sanitizer at supermarkets nationwide has caused the price of isopropyl alcohol to soar over 300% in recent weeks, Schulze said.

According to CNBC, “major distillers and brewers including Anheuser-Busch InBev, Bacardi, Diageo, Jack Daniels-maker Brown-Forman and others have launched similar efforts to donate or sell at cost the alcohol needed to make sanitizer under the World Health Organization guidelines.” In San Diego County, Stone Brewery, Kevlar Spirits and Ballast Point are all either manufacturing isopropyl alcohol or hand sanitizer, Schulze said.

 

WHAT’S CONCERNING IN INDUSTRIAL MANUFACTURING

While many San Diego businesses are tied to government contracts that some say could result in increased business in the near future, that is not the case for all; SCL customers whose brands stand on producing niche goods like guitars, golf equipment and recreational gear are closed.

According to the National Association of Manufacturers, those that have managed to remain open are also “grappling with disruptions to their businesses due to the COVID-19 outbreak, with many anticipating financial and operational consequences.” The organization, which has called on the federal government to further equip manufacturers to handle the coronavirus epidemic, has reported that over 78% of businesses anticipate a financial impact.

In the same vein, there’s also some concern among leadership at companies across the board about whether employees who contract coronavirus can sue for worker’s compensation. “I think a lot of people, in general, are just worried about their facilities closing down and losing their jobs,” Schulze said.

 

OPPORTUNITIES IN INDUSTRIAL MANUFACTURING

Two clear opportunities have presented themselves since the coronavirus epidemic hit Southern California for SCL customers in industrial manufacturing – the soaring demand for hand sanitizer and the potential to contribute to the treatment of COVID-19 with manufactured products, like gelcaps.

“These breweries and distilleries, they’re manufacturing isopropyl alcohol to disinfect their machines, their facility, and some are using it to manufacture hand sanitizer,” Schulze said. “That’s bringing in money and it’s a way for them to continue operating since it fits with compliance rules set forth by the government as far as providing critical operations.”

On the government front, opportunity also exists in efforts by industrial manufacturers rallying for provisions in a $2 trillion coronavirus rescue package they are hoping will exempt distillers and brewers from paying an excise tax on hand sanitizer production. Many manufacturers are also calling for adoption by lawmakers of a federal designation that deems manufacturing supply chains “essential” in providing supplies critical to America.

Until anything is decided or dispersed, however, SCL customers are falling into one of three categories – those who are operating “status quo” due to government contracts, those that have been deemed crucial but have shifted practices to keep their doors open, and those that are currently closed and waiting for news on when they can reopen.

 

Contact an SCL Consultant today 

In a wide range of automotive, industrial and commercial sectors, SCL remains steadfast on its commitment to product and industry knowledge, performance satisfaction and superior logistics. We protect and optimize the machines that keep our country moving. For more information on how we help can help with services including bulk purchasing or managing inventory, contact an SCL expert today.

 

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SCL Partners Report Little Disruption to Projects Currently Under Way

In the days following a state mandate by California Gov. Gavin Newsom that non-essential businesses close in an effort to minimize impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19), SCL customers reported little disruption to construction projects.

The Association of General Contractors of America (ACG) has stated it is closely monitoring the epidemic, as well as government measures aimed at lessening the virus’ impact, but it has yet to provide any recommendations on stopping projects.

On the contrary, the organization has petitioned the federal government to recognize construction as an essential business, especially after a list of “critical infrastructure” industries released by the Department of Homeland Security failed to include it.

While states have been encouraged to use the DHS list as a guideline when considering state and local COVID-19 responses, it is not tied to any federal mandate. As such, construction projects have continued to move – even those directly tied to the federal government.

WHAT’S GOOD IN CONSTRUCTION

According to SCL Fuels Specialist Keith Kerslake, dirt moving right now is on projects bid anywhere from 6-9 months ago.

“These projects have already been planned, there are already commitments that have been made and deadlines that have been set. I’ve seen no one winding down,” Kerslake said. “One of our larger partners is still working on a project that will go for three years, and they’ve given no indication they weren’t moving forward with that. Everything on the table is still happening.”

According to ACG, only a “nominal number” of projects nationwide have experienced any delays at all, and those were largely related to the delivery of manufactured and raw materials. The organization has also reported the virus has yet to impact the work force or development of projects.

WHAT’S CONCERNING IN CONSTRUCTION

There is always concern related to businesses delaying or getting out of contracts that have already been instituted due to the delays in material delivery or shortages of labor, but that has yet to materialize.

The concern right now for SCL construction partners has to do with projects yet to be bid, that is builds and tear downs scheduled to start 6-9 months from now.

“If we head into a recession obviously it will affect monies to be able to go into investments, new construction, that sort of thing,” Kerslake said. “In 6-9 months, if we have fewer construction projects or deconstruction projects, we could see a drop in construction fueling and, obviously, fueling across the board.”

OPPORTUNITIES IN CONSTRUCTION

Right now, SCL partners are focused on business as usual, but that doesn’t mean customers are necessarily searching for acquisition or other investment opportunities.

According to Kerslake, although it’d be a great time for any business to consider expanding, like other industries, construction partners are more or less in a wait-and-see mode.

“Anything new, new customers, new commitments, existing opportunities, people are probably not going to make a move right now until we get a better feeling of what’s going to happen,” he said. “They may have plans, but it doesn’t feel like anyone is going to commit right now.”

How that will affect projects moving into the fall, when contracts currently being executed come to an end, remains to be seen.

 

Contact an SCL Consultant today 

In a wide range of automotive, industrial and commercial sectors, SCL remains steadfast on its commitment to product and industry knowledge, performance satisfaction and superior logistics. We protect and optimize the machines that keep our country moving. For more information on how we help can help with services including bulk purchasing or managing inventory, contact an SCL expert today.

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With Sales Down, Dealerships and Shops Reduce Staff, Expenses to Remain Open

Although some SCL partners reported a spike in new car sales immediately following a move by the Federal Reserve slashing interest rates to nearly 0%, most in the industry are relying heavily on their service departments to carry them through the coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic.

On top of economic uncertainty, efforts to social distance – and stay home altogether – have  all but forced many dealerships to lay off sales staff and cut positions in other departments beginning in mid-March.

WHAT’S GOOD IN AUTOMOTIVE

Although the news is mostly disparaging – from disruptions in supply chains to a dramatic fall in sales – service facilities are still operating. For now, according to SCL Customer Solutions Specialist Don Parker, that’s a win.

To keep from closing their doors altogether, dealerships and independent shops have laid off staff, reduced hours, and in some cases decreased the number of technicians in their service departments. Those measures, although unfavorable, have allowed doors to remain open and work to continue.

“People are still bringing their cars in for service, whether that be for repairs or maintenance,” Parker said. “And these guys will continue working as long as they can and as hard as they can. That’s the way of the automotive industry – you’ve got family run shops that have been in business for 30-40 years, and they’re going to continue to do whatever they can to keep business as normal as possible.”

WHAT’S CONCERNING IN AUTOMOTIVE

When customers are not coming on the lot, sales are not taking place. And when cars are not being used, service lanes aren’t as full.

Those two issues alone present the greatest challenges to the automotive industry, which relies heavily on service and parts departments for income. Even if near 0% interest rates were to bring customers in, dealerships don’t have as much opportunity to earn from financing and other hard adds like they normally would.

“Right now, you have layoffs happening, especially in sales departments. You have lower profits and you have the same expenses — including rent, which is pretty high at a lot of these dealerships because they typically have large pieces of property,” Parker said. “If this goes on too long, everyone is going to have a hard time surviving. If this were to go on for 90 days there are a lot of dealers that it would really bury without some support.”

OPPORTUNITIES IN AUTOMOTIVE

Right now, opportunities in automotive are limited, but if you have cash, there is always potential.

“Unfortunately, by the time this is all over with, people are going to be selling businesses for pennies on the dollar,” Parker said. “There’s opportunity for acquisition, but honestly I think most people are just looking for ways to minimize the impact. This will be a burden on everyone in automotive in some way, but there are opportunities to help minimize the effect of this over time.”

For many, that means reducing staff and hours, taking precautions for staff members who continue to work, possibly taking advantage of small business loans, reducing expenses and biding time.

 

Contact an SCL Consultant today 

In a wide range of automotive, industrial and commercial sectors, SCL remains steadfast on its commitment to product and industry knowledge, performance satisfaction and superior logistics. We protect and optimize the machines that keep our country moving. For more information on how we help can help with services including bulk purchasing or managing inventory, contact an SCL expert today.

The post Industry Pulse: Automotive Turns to Service to Carry the Load During Coronavirus Epidemic appeared first on SCL.

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